Developer Catchup: FreeBSD at 21, Meteor at 1.0, tunnels, disklessness, neurons and 68008s

developercatchup

  • FreeBSD hits 21:FreeBSD is 21 today and you can see the original announcement preserved on the FreeBSD site and the most recent status report shows where current development was at the end of the third quarter. Looking forward to tier 1 support for more ARM platforms in FreeBSD 11.

  • Meteor hits 1.0: After a good long maturation with plenty of reworking and changes for the better – rather than those long betas which see no changes and never end – the rather splendid Meteor framework has hit version 1.0. It lets you build apps which are really smart about keeping all the users in sync with each other and builds on Node, JavaScript (on the server and browser) and other great open source foundations. And it’s open source itself. Having written apps in the past using it, I recommend it for the modern single screen web app. There’s a step by step tutorial on building an app too. If I had to pick a flaw its that it uses the curl/wget to shell anti-pattern – `curl https://install.meteor.com/ | sh – that has become rather cool but still boils down to running an unviewed, unfiltered script on your system. We need a fix for this, and we don’t need another package manager. A simple “download/scan/report&alert and offer to run” utility would do – want to be a popular person out there? Go write it!

  • Tunnelling out: I have to admit I only just found out about this one but ngrok is a useful service which lets you create a tunnel from the net to a single port on a machine without fiddling with firewalls and other stuff. Download an executable, run it with a port number and it’ll do the rest. And you can inspect the traffic easily for simple debugging.

  • Redis goes diskless: Replication usually involves disks and disks change performance and when you are all about the performance, thats critical. That’s why @antirez has been working on diskless replication for Redis. Read his introductory article to the motivation and implementation.

  • Neural networks in JavaScript: To be honest, I’ve never though about doing neural networks in the browser but it seems Juan Cazala has and his Synaptic library lets you experiment with them too.

And a little making

  • Different single board processors: Remember the 68000 series? The folks at Big Mess O Wires do and are working on building a single board computer around a 68008 (the un-power-house at the heart of the classic Sinclair QL). The aim is to get it running Linux.