Snippets: gRPC, iPython, LLVM, Pi Trees and Juice,

snippets03gRPC: Google, doing it’s whomp-here’s-a-“standard” thing, has just announced an open sourced remote procedure call framework called gRPC. With libraries for seven languages (C, C++, Java, Node.js, Python and Ruby are done – ObjC, PHP and C# coming), gRPC gets you to use Protocol Buffers to define the end points and serialisation and the libraries then use HTTP/2 to communicate exploiting the bidirectional streaming and multiplexing. There’s an new alpha of a version 3.0 of Protocol Buffers to go with it too. They may be going evil but they do produce some great engineering so this is one to watch.

iPython 3.0: Interactive shells and books are wonderful things – beyond REPLs, they let people work different with languages and data, moving from a scripted . So it’s good to see the iPython project release a iPython 3.0 and lay down the foundation for language-agnostic notebooks. This is the last monolithic release of iPython, which pulls in a host of different language kernels into the project, including Bash, Haskell, Go and even Redis. But the next stage will be to split the project into a pure Python related stuff called iPython which will also produce a kernel to plug into Jupyter, an interactive notebook environment for multiple languages. Thats a journey that starts with iPython 3.0. If you like the idea of a shell/notebook environment, start following this project as it evolves.

LLVM 3.6 Lands: The new compiler juggernaut that is LLVM rolls through another release as version 3.6 is released. According to the release notes there’s lots of tidying up and updating and quiet adoptions like the Go bindings from gollvm being introduced.

Pi Device Trees: The Raspberry Pi’s Raspbian release that arrived the the Pi 2 also came with the added bonus of switching to Device Trees which is a way of modelling and talking to the bazillion different hardware combos out there in a unified way. The Beaglebone Black’s Debian has had it for ages and now it’s the Pi’s turn. There’s a whole load of things to get your head around but this posting on the Pi forums will get you through enabling I2C, I2S, SPI and more using DT.

PiJuice: Talking Pi, there’s a nifty Hat-sized Kickstarter for a device called a PiJuice currently running which lashes a standard phone battery, real time clock and UPS and other handy things into a £24 hat so you can take out Pi walkies. It’s also pinned so you can pop another Hat on top. Looks very clean as a design.

TypeScript 1.0, IPython 2.0.0 and Rust 0.10 – Snippets

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TypeScript hits 1.0: Microsoft’s take on reworking JavaScript, TypeScript, has hit version 1.0 and is now accepting pull requests on the open source compiler (though it’s bug fixes only for now.). Meanwhile, Microsoft have embarked on an open source fest with the creation of the dotNet Foundation, now home to a .NET compiler, micro frameworks, Couchbase for .Net, various SDKs, ASP.NET modules and other stuff. And to top it all off there’s WinJS, a set of UI controls and scaffolding for making Windows applications. Microsoft may be changing, but how effective that change will be is the big question. In the meantime, TypeScript gets to fight it out in the crowded playground that is JavaScript complements/replacements with Dart, CoffeeScript and, lets not forget the next generation of JavaScript, ES6.

IPython 2.0.0: The interactive Python environment IPython, has been updated to version 2.0 and adds interactive widgets, directory naviagation, persistent URLs, a modal UI and security model to its idea of Notebooks as a container for projects. Under the hood, the codebase is now native for Python 2.7 and 3.3 which are also the minimum required versions. There’s lots more changes listed in the release notes or you can just go install it and get into the tutorial which gets you going with the rather clever world of Python powered notebooks.

Rust 0.10 oxidises: Away from the controversies at Mozilla, the Rust developers have rolled out a new Rust release, version 0.10, which continues the steady development of the systems programming language. Changes include the libextra package being broken down (‘misc’/’extras’ libraries are always a bad sign so good to see it go), cross package (crates in Rust terminology) syntax extensions, better smart pointers and I/O handling. As things kick up a notch towards a final version, there’s now a RFC process for changes and nightly releases of binary installers. It’s all still alpha but progress is good – it was recently reported that Servo, the web engine being built on Rust, has passed the Acid 2 test.