Just released: Socket.IO 1.0, Git 2.0 and OrientDB 1.7 – Snippets

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Socket.IO 1.0: Socket.IO has hit version 1.0 – the Node.js and browser library which started life as an implementation of the WebSockets interface and has gone on to “become the EventEmitter of the web”. The 1.0 release and changes are broken down in a blog posting, the first on a newly redesigned, and much more useful, Socket.IO website. In brief, modularisation, tighter code, binary support (so you can emit blobs and buffers), automated testing, better scalability using redis, more integration (including PHP support), better debugging support (and silence by default), sleeker APIs and CDN delivery. And the future plans include handling Node.js streams, Socket.IO support in Web Inspector and Firefox Dev Tools and more language and framework support. A splendid tool to have in your arsenal.

Git 2.0: The distributed version control system which made distributed version control systems cool before even version control could be cool, Git, has reached version 2.0. In the announcement of the new release, there’s a long list of all the changes and notes on backward compatibility. The 2.0 release has been anticipated by the developers for a while so a lot of ground work had already been done in previous 1.x versions making the 2.0 release look more like a minor release than a major version bump but there’s still plenty of changes and a foundation prepared for future changes. On that subject, there’s a promise of a shorter release cycle for the next release as delays have meant a number of features ‘cooking’ for longer in the ‘next’ branch.

OrientDB 1.7: Version 1.7 of the Document/Graph/Sql/NoSQL database OrientDB is available. The announcement for 1.7 notes better perforamnce, new clustering options, support for SSL and sharding, simplified configuration, new SQL commands including parallel queries, plugins for Lucene-based full text searching and more. There’s an Apache 2 licensed community edition of the database and commercially sold and supported professional and enterprise editions.

Heartbleed, MongoDB 2.6, Easier BeagleBone Black – Snippets

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Heartbleeds out: So the Heartbleed OpenSSL vulnerability is out and about and everyone is checking their systems and updating to OpenSSL 1.0.1g (go straight to the (http://www.openssl.org/source/) or wait for your OS distribution to update – it won’t be long and if it is long, consider another distribution). It’s tempting to use the various Heartbleed test sites out there, it is much safer and trustable to test for it yourself. There’s lot to look at in the bug – this diagnosis offers some insight and reminds us, yet again, how bad people are at managing memory.

MongoDB 2.6: Leading light of the NoSQL world, MongoDB has been updated to version 2.6. The release notes cover the details – updated aggregation, newly integrated text search, various order preserving changes to insert and update, a write protocol with support for bulk operations, an enhanced query engine with index intersection support and much more. A big update with lots to take in, lots to test if you are upgrading before going to production and a lot more being added to MongoDB Inc’s proprietary enterprise layer.

Easier BeagleBone Black: Setting up a BeagleBone Black (BBB) immerses you in the full gamut of configuring device trees and more. So it’s good to see a project like beaglebone-univeral-io – it’s scripts and files that configure the BBB so that all the pins (that aren’t being used to drive the HDMI and other built in components) can be used easily. Of course, there’s still more configuration that needs to be done to set what the remaining pins do so the appearance of BB Universal IO Configurator which is a GUI application to help with that. A short video shows it in action. The BBB is a great little board but needs more tools like this to help people really get to grips with it. Think of it as more than the compute power of a Raspberry Pi with much more GPIO. Meanwhile, I just got some Beaglebone collars which make it easier to locate those pins.

ElasticSearch 1.0, TokuMX 1.4, Plan 9 GPLv2’d and Python 3.4RC1 – Snippets

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ElasticSearch 1.0 springs out: The search-oriented NoSQL database, built upon Lucene, ElasticSearch has hit version 1.0. It’s a big release with a lot of changes and a lot of new features – an API for selective snapshot/restore, federated search, aggregation, distributed percolation and software “circuit breakers” to stop some more dangerous actions from overwhelming the system. An interesting post from Found.no on ElasticSearch sums up the pros and cons (like no authentication or authorisation) places ElasticSearch in the domain of “secondary store” to be used alongside a primary database.

TokuMX 1.4: Tokutek’s “MongoDB-with-Toku-engine”, TokuMX, has hit version 1.4 and is addressing the performance of sharding and replication. Toku’s engine is reputed to be very good for particular use cases and it’s interesting to see alternative storage engines under the MongoDB infrastructure.

Plan 9 goes GPL2: It’s been a long time under a open source (but unblessed-by-the-FSF) licence, but the venerable and inspiring Plan 9 has not been relicensed (mostly) under the GPLv2. In an announcement. It can be downloaded from the Akaros project (or cloned from the GitHub repo) which seems to be breeding Inferno/Plan 9 with their own many-core large-smp research.

Python 3.4 on final approach: Out of beta and hitting release candidate a few days ago, Python 3.4 is now imminent. It’s expected to land just over a month from now on March 16. Check back to our coverage of the last beta for more details of what’s coming.

Python 3.4 beta, Neo4J 2.0 RC1 and Redis 2.8.0 released – Snippets

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  • Python 3.4’s beta days: The first beta of Python 3.4 has arrived and it has got the good stuff. Pathlib lets coders work with pure paths or filesystem dependent paths with the selection of the latter taken care of for them. There’s a standardised enum module along with new statistics, asyncio and tracemalloc modules. Throw in a new pickling protocol, new string and binary hashing algorithms, a C API for custom memory allocators and standardise on pip as a packaging format and you are talking a tasty new Python due to land at the end of February 2014.

  • Neo4J 2.0 goes RC: The Neo4J graph database is heading into the home straight with a 2.0.0 release candidate and a warning that if you’ve been tracking their version 2.0 milestones you will need to perform a manual update on your database before using 2.0.0RC1. Now tagged as feature complete, the new RC will be bringing matching with properties, optional matches, relationship merges and more simplified syntax to Neo4J’s Cypher query language. That’s in addition to the Neo4J browser and other changes made over the five other milestones (5, 4,3, 2, 1).

  • Redis 2.8.0: Salvatore Sanfilippo has announced that, after almost a year of development, Redis 2.8.0 is done. If you don’t know it, Redis is a key/value store which can also handle hashes, lists and sets. The new version include a partial resync for slaves option, iterable collections, a rewritten config system, IPv6 suppport, pub/sub keyspace notifications and better consistency support and key expiration. Actually 2.8.1 is out for download too – see the release notes for more on the BSD licensed key/value store.

Cassandra’s Europe Summit – The Keynote – Extra Scaling

cassandraeyeAt the opening of the conference day at Cassandra Summit Europe 2013, Johnathan Ellis, Datastax CTO, made a point of positioning Apache Cassandra as an enterprise scalable database and one that scales in a linear fashion to massive scales. Datastax is the leading developer of, and commercial vendor of Apache Cassandra in the form of DataStax enterprise.

MongoDB was very much in the company’s sights as it showed benchmarks with Cassandra running 20 times faster than MongoDB – the reason was simple though the dataset for the benchmark was bigger than the available memory on the nodes. While MongoDB performs well with the dataset in memory, Ellis says most customers want their hot-data in memory and their cold-data on disk and thats where Cassandra has the advantage with a balanced approach to memory and disk.

Away from the benchmarking, Ellis described this years focus for Cassandra as having been on was of use. That meant enhanced CQL, the Cassandra Query Language, a new CQL protocol for language drivers, more emphasis on features like tracing, lightweight transactions for the 1% of cases that need it and cursors to reduce query complexity.

Internal enhancements were equally important though. For example, 2.0 took back control of a lot of memory management in Cassandra, from the JVM and over to a more traditionally manually handled memory manager tuned for Cassandra’s needs. This has allowed lots of data structures to reside more efficiently in memory improving performance.

Next week will see the release of Cassandra 2.0.2 which will add what the DataStax people call “rapid read protection”. This means that when a query goes out to a cluster, rather than waiting until a node times out to return an error, the system will look for return times that are out of the ordinary (in the 99th percentile) and return an error on them early. This should make the ability to respond to nodes over-paused in GC or suffering some other performance hit.

Ellis also talked about Cassandra 2.1 which is pencilled in for January 2014. This will see nesting and collection indexing added to the database. The filtering inside the Cassandra software should also be improved with a new combination of pessimistic allocation and smarter estimates of required space using HyperLogLog to work out what data overlaps between sets. Ellis described his slides in this though as “hand wavy” as there was no code written yet and asked “Don’t send me hate mail…” if it didn’t make 2.1.

DataStax’s own certified DataStax Enterprise is set to move to a Cassandra 2.0 base by the end of the year.

Updates for RethinkDB and FreeBSD and a 64-bit .NET JIT boost – Snippets

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  • RethinkDB gets multi-indexing: The developers of the open source, NoSQL database RethinkDB have announced version 1.10 which comes with the ability to index rows with fields of multiple values, like say an list of tags for a blog entry. Looking for all records with a particular tag previously required slow iteration, but now with the multi-index it is possible to index the set of values within the field and then to “get_all” for a particular tag value using that index. RethinkDB server is written in C++ and AGPL licensed with Apache licensed client drivers.
  • FreeBSD 9.2 released: In the latest FreeBSD release ZFS gets added TRIM support for solid state drives and lz4 compression and there’s updates for OpenSSL (to 0.9.8y), DTrace (to 1.9.0), Sendmail (to 8.14.7) and OpenSSH (to 6.2p2). There’s also virtio drivers and enabled Dtrace in the “GENERIC” kernel. Read more in the FreeBSD 9.2 release announcement.
  • RyuJIT for .NET: Over in the world of .NET, interesting things are afoot with a new 64-bit just-in-time compiler, RyuJIT, making its debut as a CTP (Community Technical Preview). .NET’s had a 64-bit JIT for some time, though the JIT has apparently been quite slow. RyuJIT runs twice as fast and overall gives a 30% speed up to start up. One benchmark with regular expressions went off the scale, going from a 1.4GB working set and 60 seconds run time to 199MB and 1.8 seconds run time – yes the older compiler is particularly bad at regular expressions.