Graduation Snippets – Docker 1.0, RHEL 7.0, Firefox 30.0

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Docker 1.0: The Docker container management platform has hit version 1.0 though the major work had been done by version 0.11 – this is the project’s graduation, acknowledging its ready for production. The actual packaging and management software is going to be referred to as Docker Engine now as the announcement is also the signal for Docker (the company) to roll out 1.0 of Docker Cloud, a platform for sharing Docker packaged apps. Actual changes in 1.0 are things like a new COPY command and an improved ADD command for developers and the ability to pause and resume running containers, added XFS support and performance improvements in container removal. Make a note too. Posts 2375 and 2376 are now officially the HTTP and HTTPS ports for Docker. Docker has changes how people think about package and run applications on Linux and all it would need is for major players to adopt Docker and … oh Google’s added App Engine support for Docker to go with its Compute Engine support and then there’s…

RHEL 7.0: Red Hat has rolled out version 7.0 of its enterprise Linux and 7.0 is looking like a cracking release. Top of their highlights, containers and Docker support, XFS as default file system and new caching file systems (Btrfs is still experimental), systemd and new management components and more capabilities to work with Windows domains. The release notes as with all Red Hat releases are comprehensive and cover things like the switch to GNOME 3 on the desktop (while retaining a classic shell). RHEL 7 is the commercially supported upstream for other distributions, most notably the CentOS distribution which is working on its CentOS 7 release – no dates on that yet but it is the first test of the new relationship between Red Hat and CentOS.

Firefox 30.0: Thirty… As Firefox versioning heads out of the twenties, the [release of Firefox 30.0] has brought sidebar button for toolbar, support for GStreamer 1.0, command-E find selected, various developer changes and five critical and two high security fixes. Now it is thirty, Firefox is well on its way to settling down to a boring life where change is mostly about moving the furniture about and keeping an eye on the neighbours. The place to look for excitement is Mozilla’s Servo browser, being developed in Mozilla’s Rust language and is developing steadily.

TypeScript 1.0, IPython 2.0.0 and Rust 0.10 – Snippets

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TypeScript hits 1.0: Microsoft’s take on reworking JavaScript, TypeScript, has hit version 1.0 and is now accepting pull requests on the open source compiler (though it’s bug fixes only for now.). Meanwhile, Microsoft have embarked on an open source fest with the creation of the dotNet Foundation, now home to a .NET compiler, micro frameworks, Couchbase for .Net, various SDKs, ASP.NET modules and other stuff. And to top it all off there’s WinJS, a set of UI controls and scaffolding for making Windows applications. Microsoft may be changing, but how effective that change will be is the big question. In the meantime, TypeScript gets to fight it out in the crowded playground that is JavaScript complements/replacements with Dart, CoffeeScript and, lets not forget the next generation of JavaScript, ES6.

IPython 2.0.0: The interactive Python environment IPython, has been updated to version 2.0 and adds interactive widgets, directory naviagation, persistent URLs, a modal UI and security model to its idea of Notebooks as a container for projects. Under the hood, the codebase is now native for Python 2.7 and 3.3 which are also the minimum required versions. There’s lots more changes listed in the release notes or you can just go install it and get into the tutorial which gets you going with the rather clever world of Python powered notebooks.

Rust 0.10 oxidises: Away from the controversies at Mozilla, the Rust developers have rolled out a new Rust release, version 0.10, which continues the steady development of the systems programming language. Changes include the libextra package being broken down (‘misc’/’extras’ libraries are always a bad sign so good to see it go), cross package (crates in Rust terminology) syntax extensions, better smart pointers and I/O handling. As things kick up a notch towards a final version, there’s now a RFC process for changes and nightly releases of binary installers. It’s all still alpha but progress is good – it was recently reported that Servo, the web engine being built on Rust, has passed the Acid 2 test.