TypeScript 1.0, IPython 2.0.0 and Rust 0.10 – Snippets

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TypeScript hits 1.0: Microsoft’s take on reworking JavaScript, TypeScript, has hit version 1.0 and is now accepting pull requests on the open source compiler (though it’s bug fixes only for now.). Meanwhile, Microsoft have embarked on an open source fest with the creation of the dotNet Foundation, now home to a .NET compiler, micro frameworks, Couchbase for .Net, various SDKs, ASP.NET modules and other stuff. And to top it all off there’s WinJS, a set of UI controls and scaffolding for making Windows applications. Microsoft may be changing, but how effective that change will be is the big question. In the meantime, TypeScript gets to fight it out in the crowded playground that is JavaScript complements/replacements with Dart, CoffeeScript and, lets not forget the next generation of JavaScript, ES6.

IPython 2.0.0: The interactive Python environment IPython, has been updated to version 2.0 and adds interactive widgets, directory naviagation, persistent URLs, a modal UI and security model to its idea of Notebooks as a container for projects. Under the hood, the codebase is now native for Python 2.7 and 3.3 which are also the minimum required versions. There’s lots more changes listed in the release notes or you can just go install it and get into the tutorial which gets you going with the rather clever world of Python powered notebooks.

Rust 0.10 oxidises: Away from the controversies at Mozilla, the Rust developers have rolled out a new Rust release, version 0.10, which continues the steady development of the systems programming language. Changes include the libextra package being broken down (‘misc’/’extras’ libraries are always a bad sign so good to see it go), cross package (crates in Rust terminology) syntax extensions, better smart pointers and I/O handling. As things kick up a notch towards a final version, there’s now a RFC process for changes and nightly releases of binary installers. It’s all still alpha but progress is good – it was recently reported that Servo, the web engine being built on Rust, has passed the Acid 2 test.

Enlightenment 0.18 lit, FreeNAS 9.2 released and Java 8 brews – Snippets

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  • Enlightenment Updated: The Enlightenment/EFL window manager/libraries/desktop has been updated to version 0.18.0, just a year after the long silence that led up to the release of Englightenment 0.17.0. A full list of bug fixes and improvements is in the NEWS file for the release – compositing has been merged into the core, ten crashing bugs have been fixed and modules for music control, bluetooth, DBus application menus and compositing control have been added. Downloads are available from the project’s site.

  • FreeNAS 9.2 goes final: The network storage platform FreeNAS has been updated too with over 260 fixes and a rebasing on FreeBSD 9.2. The developers say it should sport improved performance, especially with encryption if appropriate hardware is available, and be more able to cope with higher loads. The release notes offer further details – Items I like on the list are full registration of all services through multicast DNS using Avahi, which should make a server much easier to just drop into a network, and the addition of a REST API for FreeNAS for remote control.

  • Java 8’s final draft: The final draft for the Java 8 specification is now available and this is going to be the reference document to the changes being made in Java 8, due in March 2014. Lambda expressions, new date and time APIs and type annotations are referenced with pointers out to the various JSRs to where Java will be next year.

Fedora 20, Meteor 0.7.0 and hacked Linux servers examined – Snippets

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  • Fedora 20 arrives: The latest Fedora has arrived, making it into 2013 and looking pretty good. There’s oodles of changes too. Desktop users will find GNOME 3.10 is the default desktop but there’s also Cinnamon 2.0 and Enlightment available, along with the latest KDE 4.11, MATE and others. Under the hood, system administrators will find syslog gone, replaced by journald, and experimental SSD caches, while developers are getting a GUI on Fedora’s DevAssistant, updated Perl, boost, glibc and Ruby 2 with Rails 4. The full release notes will guide you around. We’ve been tracking 20 since alpha, running it on machines here and its been working well – the one thing we haven’t checked out is Fedora 20 on ARM given ARM is now a primary architecture for the distribution. Download Fedora 20 in all its forms from the project’s download page.

  • Meteor gets update smarts: The latest release of the https://www.meteor.com/ platform for web applications has moved to a smarter way of working out database changes. Meteor 0.7 changes how changes in the database are discovered, away from polling the db and creating a diff and to a technique called oplog tailing – consuming the underlying MongoDB operations log and using it to reduce the queries that have to go to the database. There are caveats, most notably, in production you’ll need a MongoDB server configured as a replica. More details on this and other changes in 0.7.0 are in the release notes.

  • Hacking Linux Servers: Ars Technica has an article on how a security researcher documented the exploitation of a Linux server with PHP holes and a perlbot. It’s a reminder that attack tools for taking on Linux servers are no longer obscure or complex things and even a script kiddie can do real damage. Old holes do persist in the wild and every old, fixed hole is ready for exploiting. Now, more than ever, keeping your servers up to date with security fixes is essential.

Mint 16, Oracle 6.5, CentOS 6.5, Tiny Core 5.1 – Linux Snippets – Update

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  • Linux Mint 16 Refreshes: Linux Mint 16 has landed in both Cinnamon and MATE flavours. Codenamed “Petra”, Mint 16’s lead Cinnamon variant comes with the new Cinnamon 2.0 (now with sound effects, improved user management and edge tiling, edge snapping and other enhancements), enhanced login screen, USB stick formatter, refined software manager and more, all built upon an Ubuntu 13.10 foundation. The MATE variant has all the non-Cinnamon related improvements, whilst sticking with the GNOME 2 desktop fork.

  • Oracle Linux 6.5: Red Hat released RHEL 6.5 a week ago and Oracle made the announcement of Oracle Linux 6.5, its Linux-based-on-RHEL offering, on Novemember 27 though it took a little longer for DVD ISOs to become available for download.

  • CentOS 6.5: CentOS, the community based RHEL clone, also has been building CentOS 6.5 since the Red Hat announcement, and was being rsynced to mirrors as of yesterday so expect the official release announcement soon – for example, the UK Mirror Service is already updated with the 6.5 release if you really really can’t wait. Update: CentOS 6.5 is now officially available from all mirrors to download along with release notes.

  • Tiny Core 5.1: At the other end of the scale, Tiny Core, the x86 Linux which takes only 10MB of space and miniscule amounts of RAM, has been updated to version 5.1. The update moves the kernel to 3.8.13, to fix a specific bug, from September’s 5.0 release which came with a 3.8.10 kernel glibc 2.16, gcc 4.7.2 and other more up to date libraries and apps.

Docker for all Linux distros, DPorts and more for DragonFlyBSD and advice for coders – Snippets

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  • Docker 0.7 unloading: With Docker 0.7, the Docker developers have made a big leap in Linux coverage. (If you are new to Docker, read the introduction to it I did for the Linux Foundation). Under the covers, Docker has used storage drivers to maintain images on disk, but up till now they’d needed a patched Linux kernel for that to work. A patch from Red Hat has changed that though and adds “DEVICEMAPPER”, a storage driver which used copy-on-write LVM snapshots and doesn’t need a patched kernel, to the list of storage drivers. The selection of the driver needed is done automagically and the resultant images are interchangable between different drivers so there’s no driver lock-in. That all means that Docker now runs on Fedora, RHEL, Ubuntu, Debian, SUSE, Arch, Gentoo and others. More drivers are coming too, for BtrFS, ZFS, Gluster and Ceph. Other additions, merged in the 0.6 cycle include offline image transfer, better port redirection, linkable containers and descriptive names for containers.

  • DragonFlyBSD updated: Version 3.6 of DragonFlyBSD – the now ten year old BSD project that sets out to give BSD native optimised clustering capabilities – has been released. The update standardises on Dports and pkg for installation tools, making around 20,000 packages available, and the process of building those 20,000 packages in parallel has allowed for the testing and near elimination of kernel contention with more cores scaling up the improvements made. There’s also i915 and KMS support, albeit experimental, and updated localisation. DragonFlyBSD is still using its HAMMER filesystem with work on HAMMER2 carrying on into DragonFlyBSD 3.7.

  • Coding Advice: Whether your learning or experienced, this article offers sage advice on how to approach coding. While we’re on the subject of advice, here’s some false things that programmers believe are true about geography, addresses, names and time.

Python 3.4 beta, Neo4J 2.0 RC1 and Redis 2.8.0 released – Snippets

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  • Python 3.4’s beta days: The first beta of Python 3.4 has arrived and it has got the good stuff. Pathlib lets coders work with pure paths or filesystem dependent paths with the selection of the latter taken care of for them. There’s a standardised enum module along with new statistics, asyncio and tracemalloc modules. Throw in a new pickling protocol, new string and binary hashing algorithms, a C API for custom memory allocators and standardise on pip as a packaging format and you are talking a tasty new Python due to land at the end of February 2014.

  • Neo4J 2.0 goes RC: The Neo4J graph database is heading into the home straight with a 2.0.0 release candidate and a warning that if you’ve been tracking their version 2.0 milestones you will need to perform a manual update on your database before using 2.0.0RC1. Now tagged as feature complete, the new RC will be bringing matching with properties, optional matches, relationship merges and more simplified syntax to Neo4J’s Cypher query language. That’s in addition to the Neo4J browser and other changes made over the five other milestones (5, 4,3, 2, 1).

  • Redis 2.8.0: Salvatore Sanfilippo has announced that, after almost a year of development, Redis 2.8.0 is done. If you don’t know it, Redis is a key/value store which can also handle hashes, lists and sets. The new version include a partial resync for slaves option, iterable collections, a rewritten config system, IPv6 suppport, pub/sub keyspace notifications and better consistency support and key expiration. Actually 2.8.1 is out for download too – see the release notes for more on the BSD licensed key/value store.

OpenSUSE 13.1, Gitorious 3.0 and a Raspberry Pi UPS – Snippets

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  • OpenSUSE 13.1 lands: The openSUSE folks have been busy and the result of their work is now available in the form of openSUSE 13.1. We shall have to see how the stabilisation work, including getting btrfs up to “everyday” (but not default) quality, pays off in practice. The other highlights of the release include OpenStack Havana, latest Apache, MySQL, MariaDB, Ruby 2 on Rails 4 and PHP 5.4.2. On the ARM front, there’s the start of AArch64 (64bit ARM) support and a new Raspberry Pi build. One of openSUSE’s foundations, YaST, has been ported to Ruby too, so more developers can work on it. Throw in GCC 4.8, C11, SDL2, Qt5.1 and stir in with a Linux 3.11 kernel, sprinkle some experimental goodness including Wayland with GNOME shell and KDE for the pioneers and what we have is what looks like openSUSE pushing forward. Downloads and release notes are available.

  • Gitorious glorious 3.0: If you prefer not to keep your code in Git repositories run by benevolent but commercial types, then Gitorious is probably on your radar as the open source hostable alternative. The team behind it have just announced Gitorious 3.0, with a new merge request UI, new dashboards, new public profile pages, new settings pages, new service integrations and lots of updates under the hood which get the RoR web app ready to make the jump, but not yet, to Ruby 2 and Rails 4. Future plans also include an integrated issue tracker.

  • Pi UPS: Say hi to the UPiS Advanced – It’s £45 but it may solve some people’s problems with getting power to their Raspberry Pi as it’s a battery backed, smart UPS board for the Pi which intelligently handles charging, recharging and going on line. There’s also a real time clock built in, along with various other interfacing options. If only I had a project to justify it…